Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Who was to blame for the Sioux Uprising of 1862?

This has been an ongoing debate and cause for hard feelings between Minnesota settlers and the Sioux community since 1862.The simple truth, dear reader, is that there was enough blame to pass around between the federal government, the Minnesota government, military and political leaders, Indian agents and traders, and the Indians themselves.

The treaties with the Sioux (Dakota) were not negotiated in good faith. The purpose of the treaties was to move Dakota Indians off their traditional hunting grounds so white settlers could move in, establish homesteads and businesses, and contribute to the tax base of the state so the state of Minnesota could grow. Indians at that time were viewed as savages, no better than blacks at that time, and less than human. The treaties were not negotiated for their benefit but rather to benefit the state of Minnesota.

The Sioux, in turn, were not paid their allotted annuities promised through the treaties because of the graft and corruption rampant within the government. During the civil war, the Sioux in far away Minnesota were even less of a priority with the government. The starving Sioux were justified in their outrage. They were not justified in those they turned their wrath against, the settlers on Minnesota's frontier who had nothing to do with the desperate conditions on the reservations. They killed more civilians during their initial massacre than were ever killed in an American Indian war before or since.

In this, the 150th anniversary of the Dakota Conflict of 1862, we commemorate all victims of the Dakota Conflict, we forgive the crimes committed by our ancestors, and we support the reconciliation long-sought by the white and Indian cultures.

Read the full story in the format of your choice exclusively at Amazon through the link below.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007O2AMX2

Monday, November 19, 2012

Timeline: November 1862 Dakota Conflict, Sioux Uprising

  
Rev. Riggs and Bishop Whipple urge clemency for Dakota involved in battles and executions only for those proven to have committed rape or killed women or children.

Now, this time in history, we are commemorating the 150th anniversary of Minnesota's Great Sioux Uprising of 1862. Read the story below in the format of your choice.


http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007O2AMX2

Sunday, November 18, 2012

Hurry! Free Promotion Ends Today!

The free Amazon promotion of this title for Kindle users ends at midnight tonight.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007O2AMX2

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Timeline For November 15, Dakota Conflict, Sioux Uprising

On November 15, 1862, General Pope, commander of US troops in the Northwest Territory, forwards records of the trials of the renegade Sioux to President Lincoln along with a letter urging Lincoln to authorize execution of all the condemned, and warning of mob violence if the executions do not go forward. It happened this day in history exactly 150 years ago.

We honor all victims of the Sioux Uprising, we forgive the crimes committed by our ancestors, and we support the reconciliation long-sought by the white and Indian cultures as the sesquicentennial of the Dakota Conflict continues.

Read the full story at the link below, exclusively on Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007O2AMX2

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Blood on the Prairie Sesquicentennial Edition, Dakota Conflict, Americfan Civil War

As the 150th anniversary of the Dakota Conflict of 1862 continues, we honor all victims of the Dakota Conflict, we forgive the crimes committed by our ancestors, and we support the reconciliation long-sought by both the white and Indian cultures.

Read the complete story in the format of your choice exclusively at Amazon through the link below.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007O2AMX2

Sunday, November 11, 2012

Timeline: November 10, 1862, Dakota Conflict, American Civil War, Abraham Lincoln

Yesterday, November 10th 1862 in history, General Pope forwards to the President names of those condemned. Lincoln asks for "a full and complete record of their convictions" and a "careful statement" indicating the more guilty and influential of the culprits."

We honor all victims of the Sioux Uprising of 1862 as the 150th anniversary commemoration continues. We forgive the crimes committed by our ancestors, and we support the reconciliation between all cultures involved in the Dakota Conflict.

Read the story in the format of your choice exclusively at Amazon at the links below.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007O2AMX2

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_20?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=blood+on+the+prairie+-+a+novel+of+the+sioux+uprising&sprefix=blood+on+the+prairie%2Cdigital-text%2C0

Friday, November 9, 2012

Timeline: November 9, 1862 Dakota Conflict

On this date in history, 1862, exactly 150 years ago today, General Henry Sibley and his troops and Indian hostages were facing a Minnesota prairie winter. He loaded the 303 condemned into wagons and moved downriver from the lower agency to Camp Lincoln near Mankato. While passing through New Ulm, the captives are attacked by an angry mob. A few are killed and several are injured. An additional 1700 uncondemned Indians are moved to Fort Snelling in St. Paul.

We honor all victims of the Sioux Uprising, we forgive the crimes committed by our ancestors, and we support the reconciliation long-sought by Indian and white cultures.

Read the story of the Dakota Conflict of 1862 at the link below.


http://www.amazon.com/dp/B002HWSX12

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Sibley's Description of the Sioux Massacre of 1862

video

Monday, November 5, 2012

Chapter 10 "Blood on the Prairie - A Novel of the Sioux Uprising" (conclusion)


 Background: Chief Scout Toby Ryker is visiting the sick and wounded soldiers from the Dakota Conflict and the larger Civil War hospitalized at Fort Snelling. He meets a mortally wounded young soldier named Edwin Balch from Glencoe, Minnesota, and accompanies him on his last journey home. We call him Eddy and have him as an amputee with gangrene. Balch is cited on page 333 of Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars 1861-1865 published in 1890 by the Pioneer Press Company, St Paul, Minnesota. The cite states: Enlisted Men Balch, Edwin, age 20, mustered in June 13, '62, mustered out (blank) Died November 27, '62 at Glencoe, Minn. This is our literary tribute to Edwin Balch.

The next morning after Ryker bid the family farewell, he untied Wino from the rear of the ambulance. He mounted up and neck-reined the big gelding back toward the Minnesota River, which would eventually take him to Mankato. The sky was clear blue and the weather was mild even though it was November. He looked over the fields as he rode along, noticing the corn now in shocks, the stalks now dried and brown, and the words of Eddy’s song came back to him:

For I would reap the yellow grain
                   And bind it in the sheaves
                   Then die when autumn winds complain
                   Among the blighted leaves

He reined Wino to a halt and sat there a moment resting his hands on the saddle pommel. He felt the old weariness coming back, the weariness of war, and the weariness of loss of life, and of burials, and the severing of friendships. It bothered him, particularly since he was still on furlough and knew he still had many tough days of duty to face. Glancing toward the sun, he said, “Pappy, what’re these times all about? What’s the wisdom to all this? I have half a notion to desert this war and go somewheres where there are but few people and live out the rest of my life there.” Of course, he knew he would never do that, but it felt kind of good to say it anyway. Clucking to Wino, he spurred the gelding gently and trotted off toward Mankato.

Private Edwin Balch died on the twenty-seventh of November, 1862, on the family farm outside of Glencoe, Minnesota. His wife, Becky, never remarried, for she never found another man she loved as much as Eddy. Before he died, he and Becky played several games of cribbage in their bedchamber. He allowed her to win most of them. Sixty-five years later, Becky joined Eddy under the sod in the windrow behind the house, never to be parted from him again. (End of chapter 10, perhaps the most poignant chapter in the book, "Blood on the Prairie - A Novel of the Sioux Uprising.")


Read the entire story of the Dakota Conflict of 1862 in the format of your choice at the links below, as the 150th anniversary of the Dakota Conflict continues. Please note the digital versions will soon be removed from Nook and Google Books, allowing the Amazon Sesquicentennial Edition to qualify for Kindle Select.
 
 

Sunday, November 4, 2012

Chapter 10 "Blood on the Prairie A Novel of the Sioux Uprising" (continued)


 Background: At this point in the story line, Chief Scout Toby Ryker is visiting the sick and wounded soldiers from the Dakota Conflict and the larger Civil War hospitalized at Fort Snelling. He meets a mortally wounded young soldier named Edwin Balch from Glencoe, Minnesota, and accompanies him on his last journey home. We call him Eddy and have him as an amputee with gangrene. Balch is cited on page 333 of Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars 1861-1865 published in 1890 by the Pioneer Press Company, St Paul, Minnesota. The cite states: Enlisted Men Balch, Edwin, age 20, mustered in June 13, '62, mustered out (blank) Died November 27, '62 at Glencoe, Minn. This is our literary tribute to Edwin Balch.

“It most certainly is not!” Becky said, bending over the cot and kissing him. “You are my shining knight, and I’ve waited much too long to make you my husband. I should have done this before you left last June, like you wanted to.”
“Becky, oh, Becky,” Eddy cried. “You have made this the happiest day of my life!”

Two hours later, after Ryker and Henrick had Eddy all tidied up and dressed in a fancy black suit and vest complete with a gold pocket watch on a fob, the wedding party moved indoors at the Balch residence. Becky and Eddy, both looking fine in their wedding clothes, were married. They posed for several pictures that the local photographer took with his big camera, Eddy sitting and Becky standing, and everyone then sat down to a sumptuous feast. It was pot roast with all the trimmings, just like Eddy told Ryker it would be. Later that night, the couple shared the bridal bedchamber and they consummated their love.

Read the entire story of the Dakota Conflict of 1862 in the format of your choice at the links below, as the 150th anniversary of the Dakota Conflict continues.
 
Barnes and Noble Nook 
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/blood-on-the-prairie-a-novel-of-the-sioux-uprising-sesquicentennial-edition-steven-m-ulmen/1110322785?ean=2940014643931

      Google Books
http://books.google.com/books?printsec=frontcover&id=6rU-6z03smwC#v=onepage&q&f=false


Saturday, November 3, 2012

Chapter 10 "Blood on the Prairie A Novel of the Sioux Uprising" (continued)


 Background: At this point in the story line, Chief Scout Toby Ryker is visiting the sick and wounded soldiers from the Dakota Conflict and the larger Civil War hospitalized at Fort Snelling. He meets a mortally wounded young soldier named Edwin Balch from Glencoe, Minnesota, and accompanies him on his last journey home. We call him Eddy and have him as an amputee with gangrene. Balch is cited on page 333 of Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars 1861-1865 published in 1890 by the Pioneer Press Company, St Paul, Minnesota. The cite states: Enlisted Men Balch, Edwin, age 20, mustered in June 13, '62, mustered out (blank) Died November 27, '62 at Glencoe, Minn. This is our literary tribute to Edwin Balch.

The following morning, Ryker and Henrick broke camp, and by seven o’clock they were headed back down the road toward Glencoe. They made steady progress all day and by the time they stopped for the night, they knew one more day would do it. The last day was very difficult on Eddy, for the road was filled with ruts, and despite Henrick’s attempts to drive the team easy, the boy’s wounds broke open. He cried out in pain whenever the ironclad wagon wheels hit a pothole, and finally they had to stop to clean and re-wrap his wounds. By the time they arrived in Glencoe, he was considerably weakened and had fallen into a light slumber.
“Hey soldier, wake up! You’re home!”
At the sound of Ryker’s voice, Eddy opened his eyes and looked around. There before him were his parents, Becky and her parents, and a minister. Becky was dressed in a beautiful white wedding gown with a long veil and held a bouquet of flowers. He looked at Ryker questioningly.
“Do you know anything about this?”
“Yup, I know all about it. Eddy, we’re going to clean you up now and dress you in a spiffy two-dollar suit. This is your wedding day!”
“Becky? Ma? Pa? Is this a joke?”
“It most certainly is not!” Becky said, bending over the cot and kissing him. “You are my shining knight, and I’ve waited much too long to make you my husband. I should have done this before you left last June, like you wanted to.”
“Becky, oh, Becky,” Eddy cried. “You have made this the happiest day of my life!” 

 Read the entire story of the Dakota Conflict of 1862 in the format of your choice at the links below, as the 150th anniversary of the Dakota Conflict continues.

Barnes and Noble Nook 
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/blood-on-the-prairie-a-novel-of-the-sioux-uprising-sesquicentennial-edition-steven-m-ulmen/1110322785?ean=2940014643931
      Google Books
http://books.google.com/books?printsec=frontcover&id=6rU-6z03smwC#v=onepage&q&f=false